posted on March 27, 2018 by Leslie Hachtel

The Lost Art of Reading

By Leslie Hachtel

Apparently, a lot of people don’t read anymore. And they boast about it as if it is some kind of accomplishment. I find that hard to understand.

I cannot fathom why people would rob themselves of the pleasure of reading a good book.

The usual reason is: I don’t have time. Two things about that are true. One, there are never enough hours in the day and two, we manage to make time for the important things. And I happen to believe that reading is just as vital to life as anything else. Certainly worth fifteen or twenty minutes a day.

I generally read when I go to bed. It takes my mind off the stresses of the day and I can go to sleep thinking about things other than my everyday challenges. I can ‘meet’ and ‘hang out’ with interesting people, go to exotic places, time travel, experience the wonders of the world having never left the cozy cocoon of my bed. I can watch conflict and resolution and hug myself with joy at the happily ever after.

When did we lose the simple pleasure of reading? Of course, I think the answer is technology. As fabulous as it is (and as I write this on my computer, I can certainly appreciate it), we are losing much. We don’t talk to each other anymore. We text, we scroll through our phones, we post on social media. But we are losing the art of conversation. And with information so readily available, we don’t need to take time out for updates, since so much is fed to us in immediate and real time. And that worries me. I miss the “good old days” when we would sit with our friends and actually socialize by talking to each other. And along with that personal loss, many also gave up just reading a book. Sitting quietly with no email, no facebook, no twitter.

Now I’m not saying give up social media or stop playing those games. I’m just advocating there is room for more. And the thing about reading—once you start doing it, I think you’ll find it hard to stop.

As a writer, I have a special interest in readers. But as a reader, I would love everyone to share in the happiness of just reading.

Leslie Hachtel

Leslie Hachtel

Leslie Hachtel was born in Ohio, raised in New York and has been a gypsy most of her adult life. Her various jobs, including licensed veterinary technician, caterer, horseback riding instructor for the disabled and advertising media buyer have given her a wealth of experiences. However, it has been writing that has consistently been her passion. She sold an episode of a TV show, had a screenplay optioned and has so far produced eleven novels, including eight historicals and three romantic suspense. Leslie lives in Cordova, Tennessee with a fabulously supportive engineer husband and her writing buddy, Jakita, a terrier.

Leslie Hachtel Contest

Leslie Hachtel is giving away THREE autographed copies of the brand new, hot off the press, BOUND TO MOROCCO to three winners (1 book each) and a $20 Amazon Gift Card to a 4th winner.

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One thought on “The Lost Art of Reading”

  1. Sharlene Wegner says:

    I notice that if I turn on Facebook, I usually end up spending 2 hrs on it! That kills good reading time, but I do like connecting that way. Also, I try to read at the gym, while on the recumbent bike. Maybe it isn’t major exercise, but it’s more active than sitting in a chair!

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