posted on November 13, 2013 by Donna Every

The Importance of Writing

PrintAre you a writer?  I don’t necessarily mean an author but someone who journals and records observations.  I want to encourage you to keep writing.

My latest novel The Price of Freedom is set in Barbados between 1694 and 1696 and includes the connection between Barbados and Carolina (as it was called at the time).  It is a romance between Richard Fairfax who sails from Carolina to visit Barbados and Deborah Edwards, a beautiful quadroon house slave who is owned by his aunt. The book goes beyond the romance, to reveal how our pre-conceived beliefs and lack of knowledge of the ones against whom we are prejudiced can influence our behavior. In one scene Sarah, the mother of the heroine says to the master that we’re all the same (human beings); it is only when we don’t know people, when we don’t mix with them (i.e. socialize) that we think they’re different.

As I spent months carrying out research to write The Price of Freedom I was eternally grateful for the writers of the past; the people who documented their observations and their daily life experiences, not even realizing that more than three hundred years later, someone would use that information in writing a book, which hopefully is not only entertaining and informative, but brings healing.

The book could not have been written authentically without the writings of people like Richard Ligon who visited Barbados in 1657 and recorded his observations in great detail, or Thomas Thistlewood of Jamaica, who kept a journal that documented even the most intimate details of his life, so that in 2013 it would amaze me to read the number of times he and his slave “wife” Phibbah had sex in one year! Too much information perhaps. That aside, he also documented the severe punishments that he meted out to his slaves which was in stark contrast to the love he appeared to have for Phibbah.  That enabled me to get a better grasp of the dichotomy that often existed in the lives of such men and to incorporate it into the book.

Other writings that were a great source of information were saved letters of women who had lived in the West Indies and wrote to friends back in England and books such as The History of Mary Prince, dictated by the slave Mary Prince, detailing her experiences at the hands of mistresses and masters.

So I hope you will enjoy my first historical novel, The Price of Freedom, and that it will demonstrate the importance of writing and saving those writings, so that future generations can learn from our experiences and have more successful lives and relationships than we have today.

donnaeveryDonna Every lives in Barbados with her husband, two children and four dogs.  The Price of Freedom is her third novel and first historical and will be available on at the end of November 2013.


Donna Every

Donna Every

Donna Every is a motivational speaker, personal change specialist and author. She lives on the beautiful island of Barbados with her husband, two children and four dogs. Her house is in the middle of the 166 sq. mile island, in one of the only two parishes with no beach.

Donna was an accountant who left the profession to pursue her dream of being a motivational speaker who evolved into an author along the way. She was featured on the cover of Personal Excellence magazine and articles based on her books What Do You Have in Your House? Surviving in Times of Financial Crisis and The Merger Mogul were featured in over 40 publications and websites such as Yahoo! Finance,,, and She was listed as one of Barbados Today’s Women Inspiring Change for International Women’s Day 2014.

Donna enjoys writing both historical and contemporary romance novels. In 2013 she released her first historical romance, The Price of Freedom, which was set in Barbados and Carolina in 1696. Her latest novel What Now? is a compelling contemporary rock star romance.

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