posted on October 21, 2016 by Callie Hutton

May I have this dance, my lady?

seducing-the-marquessRomance novels set during the Regency period in England are one of the most popular genres. Readers love them, and everything associated with them. The term “regency” refers to the period when King George III was deemed unfit to rule and his son, the Prince of Wales, (known as “Prinny”) ruled as Prince Regent (hence “Regency”). On the death of his father in 1820, the Prince Regent became George IV. This covers the time period from 1811 to 1820, although books set during the Georgian era (1795-1837) are still considered “Regency” by a lot of readers and writers.

So what is the strong appeal of this time period?

Who doesn’t like to imagine going to balls and wearing beautiful gowns? Buried deep inside us is the little girl who always wanted to be Cinderella to her Prince Charming. Formal dinners, full and empty dance cards, strict rules to break, secret liaisons, lots of money, and power.

Since I am born and bred American with no prior history of England under my belt, the research I need to do is extensive. My newest book, SEDUCING THE MARQUESS is my ninth Regency novel. When I first started writing regencies, I wasn’t real clear on the titles, ranks, rules, property rights, women’s rights, marriage laws, and so forth. I now own three binders, stuffed with Regency information, as well as numerous books, dictionaries, and progeniture charts.

The Regency period was a time when women were protected from the harsh realities of life—but had very few rights. The wealthy led wonderful lives, with the best food, clothing, entertainment, transportation, and housing—but the poor were beyond miserable. Which makes me think of the opening of Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities: “It was the best of times and the worst of times.”

I think these types of romance books are popular, also, because it is a way to escape our frenzied, too-much-information life style. It must have been pleasant to not be bombarded with constant noise pollution—but, unfortunately, with a lot of real pollution.

Times change, people do not. Therefore, every time period has its good points and bad points. I sometimes think I would like to travel through time. How nice to see men and women being polite and courteous to each other. To see people actually speaking to each other over a dinner table, not engrossed in their phones. But, am I willing to give up modern medicines, and time saving machines? No.

Hence, my best strategy is to enjoy what modern life has provided for us, but escape into writing and reading about times past. Viewing the past through rose-colored glasses might help to get through the present with a spotlight on—well—just about everything.

Amazon | BN | iBooks | Kobo | Google Play

calliehutton.com

 

Callie Hutton

Callie Hutton

Callie Hutton, USA Today bestselling author writes both Western Historical and Regency romance with "historic elements and sensory details" (The Romance Reviews). She also pens an occasional contemporary or two. Callie lives in Oklahoma with several rescue dogs, two adult children, a daughter-in-law, twin grandsons and her top cheerleader husband (although thankfully not all in the same home!). Living in the Midwest provides plenty of opportunities for Callie do pursue her interests: researching history, meeting readers, spending time with family and discovering new adventures. Callie loves to hear from readers and welcomes the opportunity to become friends, both in person or virtually. Find her online: www.calliehutton.com

One thought on “May I have this dance, my lady?”

  1. Thanks for having me here today

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest from our Blog

Get Out of My Kitchen

by Kyra Jacobs Ask anyone about my cooking skills, and you’ll soon learn I’m not the smoothest operator in the kitchen. Baking desserts I can do, but experimenting with a little dab of this and a touch of that for main courses? Uh, no. I need exact measurements and rules to follow. Sarcasm, however, runs… Read More

Read More