posted on November 5, 2013 by Molly OKeefe

Wild Child Inspiration: Crazy Stupid Love

Wild Child (3)It’s funny how time in the publishing world works. I have a book that I’m about to start that won’t be out for a year. My book WILD CHILD out last Tuesday, was finished a year ago. And the idea came together nearly a year before that. In fact, I was thinking about how that book came to be, and it’s not often I can point to one thing and say “that, that is what made me write that book.” But for WILD CHILD, it is fairly simple.

Crazy Stupid Love.

The Steve Carrell movie with Ryan Gosling, Emma Stone and Juliane Moore. If you haven’t seen it, you’re missing out.  It’s funny, emotional, part romance, part bromance. All fantastic. And while I could only dream of writing a book as entertaining and touching as that movie (not to mention a hero as incredibly perfect as Ryan Gosling is) the scene I tried really hard to recreate within the world of Wild Child with its cookie factory contest, and the live television show was the scene at the end of Crazy Stupid Love when the mini put plan that Steve Carrell had created fell apart to disastrous/hilarious results. He finds out his daughter is dating the man whore (Ryan Gosling) who has been teaching him how to be gigolo, his son loses faith in him and the man his wife slept with (Kevin Bacon) resulting in the temporary end of his marriage chooses that moment to show up.

When Ryan Gosling finds out that Kevin Bacon is the man who ended his friend’s marriage, he sucks the ring off his own finger and punches Kevin Bacon in the nose.

For his friend. Who at that moment hates him. It’s a totally masculine gesture. Unnecessary in a lot of ways, totally necessary in others. Violent. Stupid. Kind of funny.

I love it. And so I stole it.

So, have you seen Crazy Stupid Love? Did you love it as much as I did? Have you read WILD CHILD? Can you see the resemblance in that last scene at the Okra Festival?


New-Photoshoot-by-Roberta-Scroft-Crazy-Stupid-Love-2011-ryan-gosling-26987202-421-535Perfect for readers of Susan Elizabeth Phillips and Rachel Gibson, this sizzling romance tells the story of a sexy small-town mayor and a notorious “bad girl,” who discover that home really is where the heart is.
Monica Appleby is a woman with a reputation. Once she was America’s teenage “Wild Child,” with her own reality TV show. Now she’s a successful author coming home to Bishop, Arkansas, to pen the juicy follow-up to her tell-all autobiography. Problem is, the hottest man in town wants her gone. Mayor Jackson Davies is trying to convince a cookie giant to move its headquarters to his crumbling community, and Monica’s presence is just too . . . unwholesome for business. But the desire in his eyes sends a very different message: Stay, at least for a while.

Jackson needs this cookie deal to go through. His town is dying and this may be its last shot. Monica is a distraction proving too sweet, too inviting—and completely beyond his control. With every kiss he can taste her loneliness, her regrets, and her longing. Soon their uncontrollable attraction is causing all kinds of drama. But when two lost hearts take a surprise detour onto the bumpy road of unexpected love, it can only lead someplace wonderful.

“Molly O’Keefe is a unique, not-to-be-missed voice in romantic fiction.”—New York Times bestselling author Susan Andersen

Get in touch with Molly O’Keefe at or on Facebook.

Molly O

Molly O'Keefe

Molly O’Keefe is a RITA-Award winning author with 20 Harlequin novels in publication. She’s won the Romantic Times Reviewers Choice award for Best Flipside in 2005 and Best Superromance in 2008. Her first Bantam Contemporary Romances, CAN’T BUY ME LOVE will be released in June 2012 and it’s follow up CAN’T HURRY LOVE in July 2012. She lives in Toronto, Canada with her family and the largest heap of dirty laundry in North America.

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