Love's Winter Hope

An Eagle Harbor Novel Book 5

by Naomi Rawlings

Cedar Lake Press

Historical Romance, Historical Romance: Inspirational

April 24, 2017

ISBN-10: 0997193530

ISBN-13: 9780997193534

Available in: e-Book, Trade Size

Read an Excerpt

Love's Winter Hope
by Naomi Rawlings

Journey back to a time when neighbors knew each other’s names, and a handshake meant a person’s honor. The bestselling Eagle Harbor Series continues with Book 5, Love’s Winter Hope.

When Jessalyn Dowrick’s husband left her and their three daughters to head west five years earlier, she had no choice but to pick up the pieces of her broken life and continue without him, eventually supporting herself as Eagle Harbor’s seamstress, and secretly hoping her husband would return. But days soon slipped into months, and months into years, all without word of Thomas or a cent of the money he’d promised to send.

While working day and night to build a new life that his wife would be proud of, Thomas wrote Jessalyn every week, asking her to come to South Dakota. But she never arrived. In fact, she never answered a single one of his letters. When he returns to Eagle Harbor in search of answers, he finds a woman who thought him dead . . . and soon regrets he didn’t come after her earlier.

As winter closes in and storms trap Thomas in town until the harbor opens in the spring, will he be able to convince his wife he’s worth a second chance?

Come visit the historical town that readers can’t get enough of.



Naomi Rawlings' Bio

Naomi Rawlings is the author of twelve historical Christian novels, including the Amazon bestselling Eagle Harbor Series. While she’d love to claim she spends her days huddled in front of her computer vigorously typing, in reality, she spends her time homeschooling, cleaning, picking up, and pretending like her house isn’t in a constant state of chaos. She lives with her husband and three children in Michigan’s rugged Upper Peninsula, along the southern shore of Lake Superior where they get 200 inches of snow every year, and where people still grow their own vegetables and cut down their own firewood—just like in the historical novels she writes.